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Hmmm.. that video link seems to be broken for me.. but a quick google search for “Ted’s woodworking fraud” turns up a LOT of hits, even from Matthias over at woodgears.ca ( http://woodgears.ca/ted/ ) and Steve Ramsey has a page devoted to him at WWMM ( http://www.woodworkingformeremortals.com/2012/04/teds-woodworking-fraud.html ). Someone even tried to find the address listed for them and it doesn’t exist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I3rAcKT7NCw
This particular tray is made using reclaimed barn wood but the author of the project Beyond The Picket Fence surprised everyone with one fact: reclaimed barn wood has often some areas turned pink due to cow urine. If you check the project more closely, you’ll also notice some areas of the tray being almost bright pink. That’s something you don’t see every day!

TimberLine is a monthly trade magazine for the logging, sawmill, pallet, firewood and wood processing industries. Every month, TimberLine delivers information on machinery, safety, business opportunities, plant operations, company management, new products, general news, environmental issues and more. TimberLine helps readers learn about the latest technology, generate new business ideas, save $$$ on machinery/equipment and keep up with the latest breaking industry news.


@Neil What is the use of repeating lessons when there is so much more to be learned? Technology has moved on from the adz. Plumbers use PEC, insulation is sprayed, glue-lams allow for open floor plans and furnaces are no longer stoked with coal. As for the new people, if these trades cannot attract fresh blood we will all be unable to get homes built and repairs made. I don't yearn for my first home with the leaky concrete block foundation, failing well pump and an oil furnace held up by the plenum. I'll take heat pumps, solar panels and PVC waste pipes any day.You can get all the sill plate repairs and flitch beams demos you need on YouTube.
On review, it's apparent that Ted's Woodworking (and woodprix.com) is a clever sort of scam. Basically, whoever it is behind ted's woodworking and woodprix.com encourages affiliates to sell the plans, paying 75% commission on a $67 "product". That sounds very attractive, especially if you believe the claims about conversion rate (percentage of people who buy) on the site. Enough people believe the get rich hype and sign up as affiliates to try to sell the plans. This creates a huge number of affiliates. Each affiliate, in turn, creates links back to Ted's Woodworking, which raises Ted's profile to Google, and makes tedswoodworking.com the second search result on Google (after ads) when searching for "woodworking plans". Even affiliates that never sell a single copy help boost Ted's page on Google. And if you find Ted's Woodworking using a Google search, Ted doesn't have to pay anybody a commission. So even affiliates that never sell a single copy help Ted. I suspect the primary motivation for having affiliates is to boost Ted's page, rather than generating affiliate sales. With 80% commission, direct sales are 5x as valuable to Ted as affiliate sales. 

These things may be tiny in size, but building one is not that easy. It takes some serious woodworking knowledge and skill to build a nice wooden mobile stand. When I first saw one online, I just couldn’t resist thinking of buying one. But when I saw the price, I was forced to rethink. Also, a woodwork lover like me cannot be contained with just one piece and I was not willing to spend on more than one. So instead I decided to build myself one. Yes, it took some doing but the final result was satisfying. Luckily, I found this awesome tutorial online that helped me build my first ever wooden phone holder.

There are different technicalities that are involved in the woodworking business. For you to become an expert, you must be familiar with laminating, bonding, jointing, as well as fastening. It contains different blueprints that will help you to transform your work. It contains everything that you need for you to become the best professional in the industry. 

Take a scenic drive through the back roads of New England and you will inevitably spot some of the 240,000 miles of stone walls built by 19th-century farmers trying to delineate their land. You may not have a large plot to mark off, but your patios and flower beds are still deserving of a border, and one that doubles as a place to sit down will make your landscape all the more enjoyable. But no need to dig up the yard looking for rocks like the Yankee farmers had to. A wall built from cast concrete blocks made to look like stone is just as beautiful and much easier to build—especially when your "planting season" is confined to the weekends.
To corral shelf-dwelling books or DVDs that like to wander, cut 3/4-in.-thick hardwood pieces into 6-in. x 6-in. squares. Use a band saw or jigsaw to cut a slot along one edge (with the grain) that’s a smidgen wider than the shelf thickness. Stop the notch 3/4 in. from the other edge. Finish the bookend and slide it on the shelf. Want to build the shelves, too? We’ve got complete plans for great-looking shelves here.
Here’s a traditional Swedish farm accessory for gunk-laden soles. The dimensions are not critical, but be sure the edges of the slats are fairly sharp?they’re what makes the boot scraper work. Cut slats to length, then cut triangular openings on the side of a pair of 2x2s. A radial arm saw works well for this, but a table saw or band saw will also make the cut. Trim the 2x2s to length, predrill, and use galvanized screws to attach the slats from underneath. If you prefer a boot cleaner that has brushes, check out this clever project.

Remodeling is the leading magazine written exclusively for residential remodelers like you - professionals who can not afford to overlook the latest design trends, product updates, construction techniques and marketing strategies. Each month, Remodeling brings you innovative tips and expert advice to help you win contracts...work with suppliers...boost your bottom line. It is all the information you need to exercise your talents and stay ahead of the competition. Subscribe today!


There is no doubt that many woodworkers can benefit from this package. Beginners will find these woodworking plans' clear and concise nature gives them a solid foundation to build their first projects as they build their confidence to move on to more complex carpentry projects and increase their skill level. Advanced and professional woodworkers will appreciate the huge variety of different projects and the time saving value of having a high quality set of plans waiting for virtually any challenge.
We have a small dining room area in our farmhouse that is separate from the living room and kitchen. The area is much smaller in space than our last house. I was little confused that our typical rectangular farmhouse table was not going to cut it. So, I walked in I came to know that we needed to build a round dining table. So, I searched for a plan design idea and build a very own round farmhouse dining table. I was an amazing DIY plan, I just love it!
Can you believe that this amazing wine rack the image below has been built using old wood pallets? Perhaps you can. Isn’t it wonderful that your old wood pallets can be reused to build something so beautiful and useful? I am not a drinker but I liked the idea so much that I just couldn’t resist making myself one. Although later I gifted it to my parents, who totally loved it.

The obvious thing to do would be for the copyright holders to sue "Ted" to get him to stop selling these plans. But that would require the copyright holders to spend money on lawyers and some investigation to find out who "Ted" actually is. The actual address on "Ted's" website doesn't exist, and the image of Ted is a stock photo. Even if successfully sued by one copyright holder, "Ted" could just remove the offending plans and keep selling.


Teds Woodworking Plans contains more than 16,000 different diagrams and enables individuals who are new to woodwork, or are experienced in the craft, to develop their skills and new brand new techniques. The website's database is enormous, with many different videos, CAD software, blueprints, and diagrams, which can cater to a number of different demographics, no matter what their age or background.
Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.
On review, it's apparent that Ted's Woodworking (and woodprix.com) is a clever sort of scam. Basically, whoever it is behind ted's woodworking and woodprix.com encourages affiliates to sell the plans, paying 75% commission on a $67 "product". That sounds very attractive, especially if you believe the claims about conversion rate (percentage of people who buy) on the site. Enough people believe the get rich hype and sign up as affiliates to try to sell the plans. This creates a huge number of affiliates. Each affiliate, in turn, creates links back to Ted's Woodworking, which raises Ted's profile to Google, and makes tedswoodworking.com the second search result on Google (after ads) when searching for "woodworking plans". Even affiliates that never sell a single copy help boost Ted's page on Google. And if you find Ted's Woodworking using a Google search, Ted doesn't have to pay anybody a commission. So even affiliates that never sell a single copy help Ted. I suspect the primary motivation for having affiliates is to boost Ted's page, rather than generating affiliate sales. With 80% commission, direct sales are 5x as valuable to Ted as affiliate sales.
Build this handy stool in one hour and park it in your closet. You can also use it as a step to reach the high shelf. All you need is a 4 x 4-ft. sheet of 3/4-in. plywood, wood glue and a handful of 8d finish nails. Cut the plywood pieces according to the illustration. Spread wood glue on the joints, then nail them together with 8d finish nails. First nail through the sides into the back. Then nail through the top into the sides and back. Finally, mark the location of the two shelves and nail through the sides into the shelves. Don’t have floor space to spare? Build these super simple wall-mounted shoe organizers instead!
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