To corral shelf-dwelling books or DVDs that like to wander, cut 3/4-in.-thick hardwood pieces into 6-in. x 6-in. squares. Use a band saw or jigsaw to cut a slot along one edge (with the grain) that’s a smidgen wider than the shelf thickness. Stop the notch 3/4 in. from the other edge. Finish the bookend and slide it on the shelf. Want to build the shelves, too? We’ve got complete plans for great-looking shelves here.
Need a place to store those beautiful flowers from a loved one or personal garden, but not a big fan of the giant, antique vase? I strongly recommend making a bottle vase holder! These easy to design, easy to make bottle vase holders are the perfect starter project for anyone new to the world of woodworking and looking for a project to help get them off the ground.
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These 25 projects are absolutely stunning, to say the least. I would love to try out some of these designs all by myself and get started with some serious woodworking that I have been procrastinating for a long time. My favorites among these 25 are definitely the desk organizer, the bowling lane, and the tiered planter, but nevertheless, all are good in their own ways. I believe these projects only require hand tools and basic power tools like a rudimentary router and a jigsaw.
These 25 projects are absolutely stunning, to say the least. I would love to try out some of these designs all by myself and get started with some serious woodworking that I have been procrastinating for a long time. My favorites among these 25 are definitely the desk organizer, the bowling lane, and the tiered planter, but nevertheless, all are good in their own ways. I believe these projects only require hand tools and basic power tools like a rudimentary router and a jigsaw.
You'll probably want a nice place to plant yourself for the best view of your landscape. Building yourself a simple but comfy bench, and position it in a shady spot—a place to take leisurely breaks. If you're good with a jigsaw, it's not difficult to make a nice contoured one with simple horizontal slats. A well-placed bench will be a welcome respite for the constant gardener, or any visiting admirers.
Perfectly customizable for any home bar or kitchen, wooden coasters are incredibly easy to make and perfect for the beginner craftsman or craftswoman. All it really takes is some precise (or imprecise, depending on the style you wish to achieve) cuts, a little to a lot of sanding, a tiny bit of finish, and the optional design you want on the coaster.
Woodworkers are a social bunch, and there are a few popular forums where people share thoughts on tools, discuss technique at length, and—of course—upload their plans. Some of the most active online woodworking communities include Lumberjocks, Woodworking Talk, Wood Magazine, WoodNet, Kreg, and Sawmill Creek. Search those to see if they have what you’re looking for (either with their built-in search tool or with Google’s site-specific search, e.g. site:lumberjocks.com side table).
Aside from the privacy it offers, a latticework porch trellis is a perfect way to add major curb appeal to your home for $100 or less. The trellis shown here is made of cedar, but any decay-resistant wood like redwood, cypress or treated pine would also be a good option. Constructed with lap joints for a flat surface and an oval cutout for elegance, it’s a far upgrade from traditional premade garden lattice. As long as you have experience working a router, this project’s complexity lies mostly in the time it takes to cut and assemble. Get the instructions complete with detailed illustrations here.
TimberLine is a monthly trade magazine for the logging, sawmill, pallet, firewood and wood processing industries. Every month, TimberLine delivers information on machinery, safety, business opportunities, plant operations, company management, new products, general news, environmental issues and more. TimberLine helps readers learn about the latest technology, generate new business ideas, save $$$ on machinery/equipment and keep up with the latest breaking industry news.
Builder provides diversified content for builders - targeted to address how their businesses are doing. Builder sources are the best in the industry: the brightest, most esteemed economists, building scientists, and industry consultants. The greatest resource of all is other builders who provide real life, on the ground details about every aspect of their businesses, good and bad, and who offer their own experiences to help you when you need it.
Woodworkers are a social bunch, and there are a few popular forums where people share thoughts on tools, discuss technique at length, and—of course—upload their plans. Some of the most active online woodworking communities include Lumberjocks, Woodworking Talk, Wood Magazine, WoodNet, Kreg, and Sawmill Creek. Search those to see if they have what you’re looking for (either with their built-in search tool or with Google’s site-specific search, e.g. site:lumberjocks.com side table).

Turning an old door into a photo frame is another easy woodwork project. All you need is an old door and some woodworking tools and items. I am here sharing the link to the source tutorial that explains the step by step procedure for building a picture frame from an old wooden door. This tutorial was originally written by Tracy Snyder at athomewithsweett.blogspot.com who also tells you what items you may need and where to find them. If you haven’t already got an old door, you can purchase one from websites like Craigslist.


Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.
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