​Luckily, we have also managed to find a detailed video tutorial of the Barn door project that illustrates the process of building a Barn door of your own. The steps and instructions in the video tutorial are different from the source links listed above. Actually, you can make different types of designs for your Barn door depending on which one you can afford easily and DIY on your own.
On review, it's apparent that Ted's Woodworking (and woodprix.com) is a clever sort of scam. Basically, whoever it is behind ted's woodworking and woodprix.com encourages affiliates to sell the plans, paying 75% commission on a $67 "product". That sounds very attractive, especially if you believe the claims about conversion rate (percentage of people who buy) on the site. Enough people believe the get rich hype and sign up as affiliates to try to sell the plans. This creates a huge number of affiliates. Each affiliate, in turn, creates links back to Ted's Woodworking, which raises Ted's profile to Google, and makes tedswoodworking.com the second search result on Google (after ads) when searching for "woodworking plans". Even affiliates that never sell a single copy help boost Ted's page on Google. And if you find Ted's Woodworking using a Google search, Ted doesn't have to pay anybody a commission. So even affiliates that never sell a single copy help Ted. I suspect the primary motivation for having affiliates is to boost Ted's page, rather than generating affiliate sales. With 80% commission, direct sales are 5x as valuable to Ted as affiliate sales.
Hmmm.. that video link seems to be broken for me.. but a quick google search for “Ted’s woodworking fraud” turns up a LOT of hits, even from Matthias over at woodgears.ca ( http://woodgears.ca/ted/ ) and Steve Ramsey has a page devoted to him at WWMM ( http://www.woodworkingformeremortals.com/2012/04/teds-woodworking-fraud.html ). Someone even tried to find the address listed for them and it doesn’t exist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I3rAcKT7NCw 

Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
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