With a variety of styles covering every skill-level, the Great Book of Woodworking Projects has something for everyone. Whether you want a challenging project that will beautify your home, such as a stunning Stickley chest of drawers, or you need a quick and easy project for a gift, such as a keepsake box or picture frame, you will find plans that will take a few hours or a weekend to complete.

What is the one thing every woodworker needs? Yes, a workbench. Now that you have or at least I am assuming you have worked on so many woodworking projects, you are close to becoming a professional woodworker. You now probably owe yourself a nice woodworking bench. You should also know that a true woodworker never buys his bench from the market, but always builds one himself. But before you start this project, you should know what a workbench is.
Building a bookcase or bookshelf is a fairly simple woodworking plan that you can get done in just a day or two. This is also a low-cost project as well and since the project idea is free, you don't have to worry about busting through your budget. Just follow the simple steps in the tutorial and enjoy your own company building a simple bookcase on this weekend.
It might not be the easiest project in this list, but if you already have some experience with wood cutting and joinery, it won’t be any hassle at all. Thanks to the extremely detailed instructions it shouldn’t really be a problem even if you’re not very familiar with woodworking. This could actually be a great project for refining your woodworking skills as a beginner!
Woodcraft is quite possibly one of the best forms of expressing the artist in. It looks so simple yet so intricate. It helps you reconnect with nature on a spiritual level. It is dangerously addictive as people who pursue this hobby have been known to spend hours at a time working on a simple project by using various woodworking tools and never quite know it.
TimberLine is a monthly trade magazine for the logging, sawmill, pallet, firewood and wood processing industries. Every month, TimberLine delivers information on machinery, safety, business opportunities, plant operations, company management, new products, general news, environmental issues and more. TimberLine helps readers learn about the latest technology, generate new business ideas, save $$$ on machinery/equipment and keep up with the latest breaking industry news.

Ted's Woodworking is not really about woodworking plans. It's about getting money from people who should know better. The "plans" themselves are just enough to keep naive people from realizing it's a fraud so they don't ask for a refund. If you have fallen victim to this within the last 90 days, please go to ClickBank, or PayPal (or whoever processed the payment) and ask for a refund. The item is not as described, and what you got was pirated (illegal). That's reason enough for a refund.
Take a scenic drive through the back roads of New England and you will inevitably spot some of the 240,000 miles of stone walls built by 19th-century farmers trying to delineate their land. You may not have a large plot to mark off, but your patios and flower beds are still deserving of a border, and one that doubles as a place to sit down will make your landscape all the more enjoyable. But no need to dig up the yard looking for rocks like the Yankee farmers had to. A wall built from cast concrete blocks made to look like stone is just as beautiful and much easier to build—especially when your "planting season" is confined to the weekends.
Take a scenic drive through the back roads of New England and you will inevitably spot some of the 240,000 miles of stone walls built by 19th-century farmers trying to delineate their land. You may not have a large plot to mark off, but your patios and flower beds are still deserving of a border, and one that doubles as a place to sit down will make your landscape all the more enjoyable. But no need to dig up the yard looking for rocks like the Yankee farmers had to. A wall built from cast concrete blocks made to look like stone is just as beautiful and much easier to build—especially when your "planting season" is confined to the weekends.
An excellent introduction to woodworking is to use crates as your main material. The boxes are already formed, which means less assembly work for you—yet it looks impressive once your project is altogether. With this crate coffee table, you still get to practice your skills adding the casters and the center box. Finish with a little stain, and this table is ready to roll. You can find the full tutorial at DIY Vintage Chic. 
Every dollar spent on "Ted woodworking" is a dollar that could otherwise be spent on legitimate quality woodworking content, which would in turn encourage the development of more quality content. But aside from hurting producers, it also hurts the buyer. Whoever buys Ted's plans is no further ahead than they would be by searching for plans using Google. Arguably, they are further behind because they might waste time trying to use Ted's plans instead of finding better woodworking plans for free using Google.
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Here’s a traditional Swedish farm accessory for gunk-laden soles. The dimensions are not critical, but be sure the edges of the slats are fairly sharp?they’re what makes the boot scraper work. Cut slats to length, then cut triangular openings on the side of a pair of 2x2s. A radial arm saw works well for this, but a table saw or band saw will also make the cut. Trim the 2x2s to length, predrill, and use galvanized screws to attach the slats from underneath. If you prefer a boot cleaner that has brushes, check out this clever project.
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