There have been reports of customers who filed complains after finding that some videos and plans are of low quality, while there are videos and other resources that are freely available online. Others claim that there are videos and plans that come from other woodworking sources that have not been properly credited. Another cause of concern is the delay in refunds after complaints and requests for refunds were filed.
There is no doubt that many woodworkers can benefit from this package. Beginners will find these woodworking plans' clear and concise nature gives them a solid foundation to build their first projects as they build their confidence to move on to more complex carpentry projects and increase their skill level. Advanced and professional woodworkers will appreciate the huge variety of different projects and the time saving value of having a high quality set of plans waiting for virtually any challenge.
The plans range from simple items like basic tables and chairs to more artistic creations such as jigsaw puzzle tabletops, wooden animal centerpieces, plans for upcycled wooden palette furniture, wooden clocks, hidden storage, garage plans and even plans for working musical instruments like guitars. With basic woodworking know-how, anyone can come up with interesting wooden creations with these plans.
On review, it's apparent that Ted's Woodworking (and woodprix.com) is a clever sort of scam. Basically, whoever it is behind ted's woodworking and woodprix.com encourages affiliates to sell the plans, paying 75% commission on a $67 "product". That sounds very attractive, especially if you believe the claims about conversion rate (percentage of people who buy) on the site. Enough people believe the get rich hype and sign up as affiliates to try to sell the plans. This creates a huge number of affiliates. Each affiliate, in turn, creates links back to Ted's Woodworking, which raises Ted's profile to Google, and makes tedswoodworking.com the second search result on Google (after ads) when searching for "woodworking plans". Even affiliates that never sell a single copy help boost Ted's page on Google. And if you find Ted's Woodworking using a Google search, Ted doesn't have to pay anybody a commission. So even affiliates that never sell a single copy help Ted. I suspect the primary motivation for having affiliates is to boost Ted's page, rather than generating affiliate sales. With 80% commission, direct sales are 5x as valuable to Ted as affiliate sales.

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To corral shelf-dwelling books or DVDs that like to wander, cut 3/4-in.-thick hardwood pieces into 6-in. x 6-in. squares. Use a band saw or jigsaw to cut a slot along one edge (with the grain) that’s a smidgen wider than the shelf thickness. Stop the notch 3/4 in. from the other edge. Finish the bookend and slide it on the shelf. Want to build the shelves, too? We’ve got complete plans for great-looking shelves here.

TimberLine is a monthly trade magazine for the logging, sawmill, pallet, firewood and wood processing industries. Every month, TimberLine delivers information on machinery, safety, business opportunities, plant operations, company management, new products, general news, environmental issues and more. TimberLine helps readers learn about the latest technology, generate new business ideas, save $$$ on machinery/equipment and keep up with the latest breaking industry news.
Beginners will find this program most beneficial because it teaches them many things that they do not know in the past about woodworking processes. The plans were done in such a way that you can easily understand it. This is because they have material lists, custom designs, and other useful information that can help anybody for any type of woodworks that he wants to do.
The best thing about this wine rack is that it is very easy to build. All you need is the basic understanding of woodworking and a few tools to get started. You can modify your wine rack any way you want or build in a design or color different from this one. The basic steps to build a wooden wine rack are the same for all variants. I have included here the video tutorial that I followed in order to build myself a pallet wide rack.
Working with reclaimed wood is a savvy use of resources, and the material's country appeal is undeniable. With just a saw and a small drill, you can reuse old fencing to make these simple woodworking projects: picket-inspired picture frames. Finish them off by hot-gluing clothespins or bulldog clips to hang your prints. Here’s a step-by-step guide.
Just make sure to use non-toxic wood and non-toxic finishes like Raw Linseed Oil or Carnauba Wax so that dangerous chemicals from other woods and finishes doesn’t contaminate the food that goes onto the cutting board. You can also opt to include an indent for the knife, so the chef can put the knife into the cutting board when the knife is not currently in use.
Teds Woodworking is a simple solution to this problem. The ambitious project was started by Ted McGrath, the brains of Teds Woodworking. There are many questions raised about the hype around this gentleman but if one looks at his repertoire, it is more than enough to put these doubts to rest. Ted has been in the woodworking business for decades now and has garnered invaluable knowledge in the field of carpentry. Apart from being an educator and professional woodworker in the discipline, Ted McGrath is also a member of the Architectural Woodwork Institute, a mark of his true potential and credibility. With his experience in the field, Ted McGrath was responsible for collating all his knowledge in the field into a comprehensive guide for woodworking.
Here’s a traditional Swedish farm accessory for gunk-laden soles. The dimensions are not critical, but be sure the edges of the slats are fairly sharp?they’re what makes the boot scraper work. Cut slats to length, then cut triangular openings on the side of a pair of 2x2s. A radial arm saw works well for this, but a table saw or band saw will also make the cut. Trim the 2x2s to length, predrill, and use galvanized screws to attach the slats from underneath. If you prefer a boot cleaner that has brushes, check out this clever project. 
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