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On review, it's apparent that Ted's Woodworking (and woodprix.com) is a clever sort of scam. Basically, whoever it is behind ted's woodworking and woodprix.com encourages affiliates to sell the plans, paying 75% commission on a $67 "product". That sounds very attractive, especially if you believe the claims about conversion rate (percentage of people who buy) on the site. Enough people believe the get rich hype and sign up as affiliates to try to sell the plans. This creates a huge number of affiliates. Each affiliate, in turn, creates links back to Ted's Woodworking, which raises Ted's profile to Google, and makes tedswoodworking.com the second search result on Google (after ads) when searching for "woodworking plans". Even affiliates that never sell a single copy help boost Ted's page on Google. And if you find Ted's Woodworking using a Google search, Ted doesn't have to pay anybody a commission. So even affiliates that never sell a single copy help Ted. I suspect the primary motivation for having affiliates is to boost Ted's page, rather than generating affiliate sales. With 80% commission, direct sales are 5x as valuable to Ted as affiliate sales.
Peter went on the Internet looking for some woodworking plans, hoping to find a birthday present for his brother. He stumbled upon Tedswoodworking.com. He was amazed at the products available on the Teds Woodworking website. Teds Woodworking has over 15,000 projects and woodworking plans. He signed on, and saved so much money – it was unbelievable. He wanted to build an outdoor set, but never really knew how to do this, or could never really follow the plans. So, he was able to do that from Ted’s Woodworking. Peter got all the blueprints, the plans, the materials list, full color pictures, easy to follow, everything was detailed, and understandable to him, especially since he’s a visual guy. He has a hard time with written instructions.  Also, he signed up for Ted’s free bonuses, which includes a CAD plan viewer, and using this, he can design his own furniture, on his own computer. It was so inexpensive for all this, and overall an unbelievable price for the set. Also included were 150 woodworking videos, so he now has a guided instruction set for 150 different pieces of furniture to build. He’s very happy to have found tedswoodworking.com online. Once you see everything on the site, you’ll either buy this package for yourself, or as a gift for a family member or a friend.
There’s a lot of space above the shelf in most closets. Even though it’s a little hard to reach, it’s a great place to store seldom-used items. Make use of this wasted space by adding a second shelf above the existing one. Buy enough closet shelving material to match the length of the existing shelf plus enough for two end supports and middle supports over each bracket. Twelve-inch-wide shelving is available in various lengths and finishes at home centers and lumberyards.

This plan is probably the easiest plan ever added in the list. The one who is working on this project, don’t need any professional skills but just knowing some basics of woodworking will be enough for this DIY. You will get step by step detailed process of this tutorial in the source linked tutorial. This tutorial will surely help you to build this plan quickly.
With a pencil and a protractor, divide the larger disc into 30-degree wedges to create 12 center lines for the bottle indents. Center and trace the smaller disc on top of the larger disc. Next, with a drill press, drill 3/8-in.-deep holes on the 12 center lines with the 1-7/8-in. Forstner bit, spacing them between the disc’s outer edge and the traced circle. Next, divide the smaller disc into 60-degree wedges and drill six more 3/8-in.-deep holes with the Forstner bit.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
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