Hi Liz. I am sorry you were having trouble unsubscribing to the newsletter. Your information has been updated. Your email address has been removed from our Woodworkers Guild of America E-Newsletter mailing list. Please allow up to 5 business days for your request to be completed. If you have any questions, please contact our customer service team at 1-855-253-0822.
You can also use Google image search to research a project. Unlike the PDF search, the image search provides a photo of what the project will look like, which is helpful in determining if you want to pursue building it. By doing an image search for how to build a step stool, you will have a ton of options that all lead to woodworking plans of various quality. (The how to part of these is important—otherwise you’ll just get pictures of step stools.)
This particular tray is made using reclaimed barn wood but the author of the project Beyond The Picket Fence surprised everyone with one fact: reclaimed barn wood has often some areas turned pink due to cow urine. If you check the project more closely, you’ll also notice some areas of the tray being almost bright pink. That’s something you don’t see every day!

Some of these spams were forwarded to me by followers of my website. I noticed right away that the links in the email went thru redirects on MailChimp's servers. The email itself also originated from a MailChimp server (mail52.us1.mcsv.net 204.232.163.52). Because I also used MailChimp for my mailing list, my first thought was that my MailChimp account had been compromised. But on further investigation, I realized the spammer used a list different from my mailing list. But I changed my password just for good measure!
Quite honestly, you can probably find over a thousand woodworking guides out there. There are many magazines that offer monthly subscriptions for woodworking enthusiasts of all skill levels, from weekend woodworkers to the professional artisans. There are also plenty of books and guides that include woodworking plans available online and/or at your local book store.

Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
×