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Really nice projects but I wish they didn’t use machines every every single step not everyone has a full commercial shop with huge commercial sized machines that cost thousands of dollars in their house. They need to start focusing on hand tools what what the average person has in their house like table saw and drills and stuff like that not everyone has a massive router table with specialty fence and machine or a commercial band saw or massive commercial table saw or huge joiners and thickness planners. It’s not prectical for most people. The steps are short too like Ok do this whole section on this commercial machine that not average woodworker owns and only someone with a commercial company would even have access to but those people aren’t buying this book because they know how to do these things already they don’t need a book telling them how to do what the legit do as a career. The people buying this book are normal people trying to do this as a hobby for fun at home. So cater to them don’t take a short cut because it’s easy for you to tell someone to do something you can do in two seconds but those people have to somehow figure out how to do this one their own in a way not shown in the book because they don’t have the machines you do. It’s Being lazy and writing a book that’s almost completely useless to someone trying to make these projects. But if I did own all these machines and has all that space and money and materials it’s a good book.
So the way it works is you’re going to enter your credit card information on the next page. After that, you’ll get instant access to the package. It’s kind of a membership site, but don’t worry about a monthly membership fee or anything like that. You will pay only once and that’s all you pay. There’s no additional charges, no hidden charges, no nothing like that. For a small fee I will also ship worldwide, the DVDs of all the plans and bonuses.
Perfectly customizable for any home bar or kitchen, wooden coasters are incredibly easy to make and perfect for the beginner craftsman or craftswoman. All it really takes is some precise (or imprecise, depending on the style you wish to achieve) cuts, a little to a lot of sanding, a tiny bit of finish, and the optional design you want on the coaster.
It doesn’t really matter if you have been doing woodworking for years or if you’re still a complete newbie like myself, the fact is you can always use some easy woodworking plans, no matter what level you’re at. Following simple, step by step, and easy to read woodworking plans will make it much easier for you to complete projects and will save you so much time rather than having to piece together complicated Egyptian Hieroglyphics just so you can just build a bookcase!

Cut the 6-1/2-in. x 3-in. lid from the leftover board, and slice the remaining piece into 1/4-in.-thick pieces for the sides and end of the box. Glue them around the plywood floor. Cut a rabbet on three sides of the lid so it fits snugly on the box and drill a 5/8-in. hole for a finger pull. Then just add a finish and you’ve got a beautiful, useful gift. If you don’t have time to make a gift this year, consider offering to do something for the person. You could offer to sharpen their knives! Here’s how.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
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